Tradeswomen Australia’s Response to the Victorian Government’s Budget

It is vital to maintain as many apprenticeships as possible to retain the skill levels that will be needed to rebuild the social and economic foundations of the Victorian economy. 

 

Tradeswomen Australia today welcomed the Victorian Government’s commitment to the employment of more women in the trades area, with a focus on both young apprentices and mature women being considered in employment and budget announcements. 

 

Managing Director of Tradeswomen Australia, Fiona McDonald said women in Australia have been isolated from trades jobs through historic gender discrimination barriers, a lack of promotion of trades to girls at secondary school level, and in some cases, a lack of knowledge by parents.
 
 
“This has resulted in women in Australia facing sexual discrimination stopping them from breaking into the core trades of carpentry, automotive and electrical, which has remained at less than 2% for over twenty-five years.” 
 
 
“The commitment by the Victorian Government for a coordinated range of building projects linked to social, and economic development, will help mark a key turning point for women to enter the trades.”
 
 
Ms McDonald said the proposed improvement in education pathways for students into trades with a focus to increase the number of women apprentices, will be a major benefit to existing trades women and young female apprentices entering a more gender balanced workplace.
 
 
The $5.3 billion building blitz on new public housing and other projects recently announced by the Victorian Government, should be an outstanding national showcase of Government policy and commitment to lift the number of women employed in trades. 
 
 
“By ensuring tenders require strong representation of qualified tradeswomen and pathways for new tradeswomen to enter, the social impact of the program and expenditure will be greatly increased,” Ms McDonald said.
 
 
NB: The National Skills Needs List (2019) lists 65 trades that are experiencing national skills shortages. Of those, 62 can be classed as male-dominated trades; only 3 could be classed as female-dominated.
 
 
 
Media Enquiries:
Ron Smith, Media Communications, Tradeswomen Australia – Mobile: 0417 329 201